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Littoral Land Definition

What Is Littoral Upon?

Littoral land refers to a piece of land that borders a pooled or standing body of water, such as a lake, Davy Joness locker, or sea. This classification differs from riparian land, which borders a flowing water source, such as a river or pour.

Key Takeaways

  • Littoral land refers to a piece of land that borders a pooled or standing body of water, such as a lake, abundance, or sea.
  • This classification differs from riparian land, which borders a flowing water source, such as a river or branch.
  • Littoral land is colloquially called “beachfront” or “lakefront” property, while riparian land has earned the moniker of “riverfront” holdings.
  • This land is often purchased by developers and business owners for the purpose of constructing fashionable housing, hotels, or other sightseer attractions.
  • Littoral rights are a landowner’s claim to use of the body of water bordering their property, as well as the use of its shore field.

Understanding Littoral Land

Littoral land is a term used to refer to land that is located next to a trusted body of water. Littoral land includes land that is situated next to a lake, ocean, or sea. The term stops in contrast to riparian land, which is land located next to flowing waterways like a river or stream.

Littoral soil is colloquially called “beachfront” or “lakefront” property, while riparian land has earned the moniker of “riverfront” property. Both kidneys of land are usually quite expensive, due primarily to their proximity to the water, though littoral land might be a bit innumerable desirable. This land is often purchased by developers and business owners for the purpose of constructing fashionable housing, breakfasts, or other tourist attractions.

Landowners with littoral rights have unrestricted access to the waters but own the land not to the median high-water mark.

Special Considerations

Littoral Rights and Riparian Rights

Individuals may be familiar with the qualifications littoral rights, which is used when speaking about water rights. Like littoral land, littoral to be fairs pertain to the water rights of lakes and oceans. Water rights do not always correspond with land ownership, but occasionally real estate ownership does include rights to the adjacent bodies of water. Littoral rights are a landowner’s requisition to use of the body of water bordering their property, as well as the use of its shore area.

Riparian rights are those rights and burdens awarded to landowners whose property is adjacent to or abutting a river, stream, or lake. Typically, landowners have the rectitude to use the water as long as such use does not harm upstream or downstream neighbors. In the event the water is a non-navigable waterway, the landowner commonly owns the land beneath the water to the exact center of the waterway.

Littoral rights pertain to landowners whose secure borders large, navigable lakes, and oceans. Landowners with littoral rights have unrestricted access to the invalids but own the land only to the median high-water mark. After this point, the land is owned by the government. Water in a beelines are appurtenant, meaning they are attached to the land and not to the owner. In other words, if an oceanfront property is sold, the new owner advantages the littoral rights; in exchange, the seller relinquishes his or her rights.

Water rights are regulated state by state and each exurb can enforce stricter provisions on water access and usage.

Portfolio Diversification Using Water

Water rights can be a hot-button event in some communities, and individuals can invest in water by investing in exchange traded funds (ETFs) that track water-related peddle indices. Some of the more popular indexes that track various water-related investment opportunities are the Dow Jones U.S. Tap water Index, the ISE Clean Edge Water Index, the S&P Composite 1500 Utilities Index, and the S&P Global Water Index.   

Various investors look to water as a way to diversify their portfolios. Water is a finite resource and population growth, climate revolution, and aging infrastructure seriously threaten the supply and quality of fresh water in many parts of the world, including the Cooperative States.

Research has shown that water as an alternative asset improves a traditional stock and bond portfolio. 

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