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Young adults who use e-cigarettes much more likely to switch to real tobacco cigs

Start vaping — and you could be touching on to the harder stuff real soon.

A new study finds that amidst young adults who didn’t smoke cigarettes, the ones who had used electronic cigarettes were profuse than four times as likely than nonvaping peers to start smoking accustomed tobacco cigarettes within 18 months.

Almost half of the participants in the scan who were vaping later began using regular cigarettes for the primary time, according to the findings published Monday in the American Journal of Drug.

The research, from the University of Pittsburgh, come as e-cigarettes are being hawked as a less harmful alternative to smoking tobacco cigarettes, which are recognized to cause cancer. E-cigarettes deliver users a dose of nicotine in aerosol construct, instead of from smoke that is the result of combusted tobacco.

Dr. Brian Primack, administrator of Pitt’s Center for Research on Media, Technology and Health, said the fruits were surprising.

He noted that the average age of initiation for tobacco smokers is 11.2 years old. The new reading, Primack said in an interview with CNBC, suggests that the profession of vaping could turn someone much older than that who wish not otherwise be a cigarette smoker into one.

“By the time someone has turned 18 and has on no account touched a cigarette, it would be very unlikely [otherwise] that the individual would be starting to smoke cigarettes anytime soon,” he said.

Primack’s weigh looked at the experiences of a group of people age 18 to 30 who said they had not smoked cigarettes.

Eighteen months after answering a questionnaire round their tobacco use, the 915 participants completed a follow-up survey.

Of all the woman in that group, 11.2 percent said they had started smoking tobacco cigarettes, the research rest.

But the people in the group who had used e-cigarettes were much more liable to have switched to traditional cigarettes.

Among people with a record of e-cig use, 47.7 percent had started smoking tobacco cigarettes within the 18 months.

That juxtaposes to just 10.2 percent of those who had not used e-cigarettes, the study set.

Researchers weighted the findings by over- or under-emphasizing answers of participants to prevail upon them representative of the overall U.S. population.

But even after the weighting is turn out, there was a wide gap between vapers and nonvapers.

A total of 37.5 percent of e-cig owners in the nonweighted results had begun smoking regular cigarettes, compared with 9 percent of the nonusers of e-cigs.

Primack well-known that earlier research he did on a younger age group, 16- to 26-year-olds, had bring about a similar tendency among vapers to transition to regular cigarettes.

Some in the flesh, Primack said, had suggested the previous findings might have been skewed by not accounting for people who if not would have begun smoking regular tobacco regardless of their e-cig form.

Primack said his study did not examine why vapers were more promising to switch to tobacco, but he suggested there might be several explanations.

“One plead with is certainly biochemical,” Primack said.

“E-cigarettes contain nicotine, and it is one of the most addictive fabrics we know of,” he said.

E-cig users as a result may end up looking to get a bigger hit of nicotine from stock cigarettes.

Another potential explanation is the “behavior argument.”

E-cigarette makers bear designed their products to replicate the “feel” of traditional cigarettes, whose narcotic addicts often value the ritual of using them.

Primack said that delineate could work in reverse by making it easier for e-cig users to metastasis to tobacco cigarette users because of the similarity in the way they are used.

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